Cover Reveal: Kissing Frogs by Alisha Sevigny

I am very excited to reveal Alisha Sevigny’s Kissing Frogs’ book cover from Fierce Ink Press.

Before the big reveal, here’s what the novel is all about:

Finding Prince Charming sure is hard work.

Popular high school senior Jessica Stone has a secret: she used to be a nerd — a goody two-shoes, grade-skipping, all-state spelling bee champ kind of nerd. But she gave herself the ultimate makeover and applied all her academic genius to study and imitate the social elite and now she rules the school. With her cool new friends and hottest-guy-in-school boyfriend, life’s a beach — and that’s where she’s headed for spring break. That is, until her biology teacher breaks the bad news that she’s failing and her only chance to make up the grade is to join the conservation club in Panama to save the golden frog.

Jess finds herself in a foreign country with a new social crew, including a ghost from her past that could threaten her queen bee reputation. Travis Henley may have grown up, but he still likes to play childish games and as payment for retrieving her lost ring from the bottom of a jungle pool, he wants three non-dates. The last thing Jess wants to do is be around him any more than she has to, but she’s desperate to keep him quiet and agrees. Soon she begins to realize the worth of her inner nerd, and that one frog in particular could be her prince in disguise.

Set in the lush and tropical El Valle de Anton, Kissing Frogs is a smart and funny re-imagining of “The Frog Prince” with an environmental heartbeat.

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Book to Film: The Fault in Our Stars

The-Fault-in-Our-Stars-movie-poster

John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars has become massively popular among readers that it is no surprise it was turned into a movie. Before you read my review of the movie, be sure to read up on my review of the novel.

I believe the movie stayed very true to the book. It captured the initial emotions I had while reading the book. Even when I knew where the ending would lead, I couldn’t help but still tear up. The actors, especially Ansel Elgort who played August, played the characters with honestly and tapped into their vulnerability perfectly. As a fan of the book, I am super happy that a lot of the major scenes were transferred over and translated well onto the big screen. Continue reading

Blog Tour: Fierce Ink Press’ Becoming Fierce: Teen Stories IRL

Becoming-Fierce-coverNo one has ever said, “Being a teenager is so easy!” In Fierce Ink Press’ anthology Becoming Fierce: Teen Stories IRL, it features real life stories from authors about their teen lives.

There’s everything from love and friendship, bullies, disabilities, drugs and addiction, suicide, unrequited love, self-esteem and body issues, and just trying to fit in. Some of the short stories are light-hearted, bringing a smile to your face while others show a darker side to teenage life. Every story gives you a chance to take something away from it, whether it’s insight on how other people may be feeling, learning something from someone else’s experiences or simply connecting to a story because you’ve had a similar experience.

I connected with nearly every story in some way, big or small. The issues the authors brought up in their own stories I’ve either personally connected with or know someone who has. My two favourite short stories in this anthology were: Jo Treggiari’s Love You Like Suicide and Patti Larsen’s Prince Nameless. Continue reading

Review: Virgin by Radhika Sanghani

Virgin-novelWarning: This review contains mature subject matter.

Being a girl in the 21st century can be overwhelming and confusing, especially due to the many pressures we get from society, our peers, and even ourselves.  In Western society, sex, or not having sex, is high on the list. We get mixed signals from the media and our peers. Girls and women are considered prudes if they’re virgins or sluts if they aren’t.

In Sanghani’s Virgin, it follows a twenty-one year old virgin named Ellie who decides to find someone to lose her v-card to before she graduates from college. It is one perspective, both honest and hilarious, that sheds light on the self-discovery and confusion of womanhood and sexuality. Continue reading